Periodontal Disease and Respiratory Disease

Southern California Family Dentistry

Southern California Family Dentistry - Whittier, Lake Forest, San Clemente - Periodontal Treatment

Periodontal disease (also called periodontitis and gum disease), is the gradual condition that leads to the recession of the gum or jawbone, and ultimately tooth loss. Periodontal disease may lead to severe health problems in various parts of the body due to the toxins found in plaque. When the gum tissues become inflamed, the destructive results include the irritation of the gingiva (gum tissue). This in turn causes bacterial infection (gingivitis) that damages the underlying bone and gum tissue.

Respiratory disease is a medical condition also known as lung disease. Current research has linked periodontal disease to respiratory disease and discovered that periodontitis increases the chances of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and may actually play a causal role in the contraction of pneumonia, bronchitis and emphysema.

Periodontal disease is a progressive condition that generally begins with a bacterial infection.  The bacteria found in plaque begin to colonize in gingival tissue, causing an inflammatory response in which the body destroys both gum and bone tissue.  The sufferer may notice the teeth “lengthening” as the gums recede while the disease progresses.

If left untreated, erosion of the bone tissue brings about a less stable base for the teeth, meaning loose, shifting or complete tooth loss.

Among the most common respiratory diseases linked to periodontal disease are COPD, pneumonia, and bronchitis. Usually, respiratory infections from bacteria colonize when one inhales the fine droplets that end up in the lungs. COPD should be taken extremely seriously as it is the leading cause of death

Connection between Respiratory Disease and Periodontitis

Bacterial spread: The specific type of oral bacterium that causes periodontal disease can easily be drawn into the lower respiratory tract.  Once the bacteria colonize in the lungs, it can cause pneumonia and exacerbate serious conditions such as COPD.

Low immunity: Majority of people who experience chronic or persistent respiratory problems suffer from low immunity. This low immunity allows oral bacteria to embed itself above and below the gum line without being challenged by the body’s immune system.  Not only does this accelerate the progression of periodontal disease, it also puts the sufferer at increased risk of developing emphysema, pneumonia and COPD.

Modifiable factors: Smoking and tobacco use are pivotal factors that lead to COPD and other chronic respiratory conditions. Tobacco use decelerates the healing process of periodontitis and causes the deeper growth of gum pockets. Avoiding smoking and tobacco use will reduce chances of chronic respiratory conditions.

Inflammation: Oral tissue becomes inflamed and aggravated during the presence of periodontitis. It is plausible that oral bacteria trigger the irritation that inflames the lung lining and restricts air from circulating to the lungs.

Diagnosis and Treatment

The dentist and doctor must work as a team when both respiratory disease and periodontal disease are present in a patient. Through collaboration, both diseases can be contained and professionally alleviated.

In order to treat the infection of the bacteria more conveniently, the dentist must analyze the depth of inflammation and tissue loss. In order to prevent the infection from returning, the bacteria and tarter must be scrapped off in order to obtain the health of the gum. The cleaning and treatment of the gum pockets with antibiotics assuage the infected areas as well. The dentist will thoroughly assuage any discomfort in the oral region, which will bring about healthier gums. Furthermore, the recurrent, irritating respiratory infections linked to COPD will decrease as well.

Please ask your dentist if you have questions or concerns about respiratory disease or periodontal disease.

 

Diagnosis

Your dentist or dental hygienist will diagnose your condition during a periodontal examination where a periodontal probe, which is a small dental instrument, used to measure the pocket or space (sulcus) between the gums and teeth. If the sulcus is healthy, it will not bleed. If the pockets are more than 3 millimeters and bleed, your doctor will make a diagnosis based on the categories below.

Your dentist or hygienist will use pocket depths, amount of bleeding, inflammation, tooth mobility, etc., to make a diagnosis that will fall into a category below:

Gingivitis: A mild inflammation of the gums, caused when toxins colonize in the plaque.

Periodontitis: Attacks the gums and the bone around the teeth in which bacteria multiply and if gone unattended, transforms into calculus (tartar).

Advanced Periodontitis: As the bone and surrounding gum are destroyed, the teeth begin to lose more stability, causing teeth to become extremely loose; different ranges of bone loss may exist.

Maintenance

Registered Dental Hygienists usually perform dental cleanings. Dental cleaning eliminates calculus (tartar), which is a hardened plaque that attaches itself to the tooth when left unattended. Calculus can only be removed with special dental devices. Our aim is to provide our patients with a healthy and lasting smile that shines for a lifetime.

Home-care is a crucial aspect of maintaining a beautiful and healthy smile. Plaque and bacteria are the leading cause of dental disease. You can begin the journey towards healthier teeth by consuming wholesome foods, decreasing sugary snacks, and properly utilizing dental aids. After your periodontal treatment, your dentist and dental hygienist will advise that you have consistent maintenance cleanings (periodontal cleanings) four times a year.

In addition to your periodontal cleaning and evaluation, your appointment will usually include the following examinations:

  • Oral cancer screening
  • Oral hygiene recommendations
  • Teeth polishing
  • Diagnostic x-rays (radiographs)
  • Existing restorations
  • Tooth decay

Treatment for Periodontal Disease

Surgical and nonsurgical treatments are available, but the treatment used depends on the condition of the patient’s teeth, jawbone, and gums. A compressive examination of the mouth must be performed prior to any treatment recommendation.

Scaling and planing: The bacteria and tarter must be scrapped off in order to obtain the health of the gum. The cleaning and treatment of the gum pockets with antibiotics assuage the infected areas.

Tissue regeneration: When destruction of bone and gum tissue occurs, grafting techniques encourage regrowth. The regeneration process can speed up when a membrane is rooted into the affected areas.

Pocket elimination surgery: Also known as flap surgery, this surgical procedure shrinks the pocket size between the gums and teeth.  An alternative choice is the surgery of the jawbone, which aims to remove depressions in the bone that colonize bacteria.

Dental implants: Implanting prosthetic teeth into the jawbone can restore the physical features and functionality of the mouth when there is tooth loss. Tissue renewal procedures may be obligatory before placing any implants in order to strengthen the bone.

Please ask your dentist if you have questions or concerns about periodontal treatment, periodontal disease or dental implants.

If left untreated, erosion of the bone tissue brings about a less stable base for the teeth, meaning loose, shifting or complete tooth loss.

Among the most common respiratory diseases linked to periodontal disease are COPD, pneumonia, and bronchitis. Usually, respiratory infections from bacteria colonize when one inhales the fine droplets that end up in the lungs. COPD should be taken extremely seriously as it is the leading cause of death

Connection between Respiratory Disease and Periodontitis

Bacterial spread: The specific type of oral bacterium that causes periodontal disease can easily be drawn into the lower respiratory tract.  Once the bacteria colonize in the lungs, it can cause pneumonia and exacerbate serious conditions such as COPD.

Low immunity: Majority of people who experience chronic or persistent respiratory problems suffer from low immunity. This low immunity allows oral bacteria to embed itself above and below the gum line without being challenged by the body’s immune system.  Not only does this accelerate the progression of periodontal disease, it also puts the sufferer at increased risk of developing emphysema, pneumonia and COPD.

Modifiable factors: Smoking and tobacco use are pivotal factors that lead to COPD and other chronic respiratory conditions. Tobacco use decelerates the healing process of periodontitis and causes the deeper growth of gum pockets. Avoiding smoking and tobacco use will reduce chances of chronic respiratory conditions.

Inflammation: Oral tissue becomes inflamed and aggravated during the presence of periodontitis. It is plausible that oral bacteria trigger the irritation that inflames the lung lining and restricts air from circulating to the lungs.

Diagnosis and Treatment

The dentist and doctor must work as a team when both respiratory disease and periodontal disease are present in a patient. Through collaboration, both diseases can be contained and professionally alleviated.

In order to treat the infection of the bacteria more conveniently, the dentist must analyze the depth of inflammation and tissue loss. In order to prevent the infection from returning, the bacteria and tarter must be scrapped off in order to obtain the health of the gum. The cleaning and treatment of the gum pockets with antibiotics assuage the infected areas as well. The dentist will thoroughly assuage any discomfort in the oral region, which will bring about healthier gums. Furthermore, the recurrent, irritating respiratory infections linked to COPD will decrease as well.

Please ask your dentist if you have questions or concerns about respiratory disease or periodontal disease.

Experienced and Highly-Trained

DENTAL TEAM

Southern California Family Dentistry - Hossein Jahangiri DDS - Dentist - Whittier, Lake Forest, San Clemente

DR HOSSEIN JAHANGIRI

General, Implant & Cosmetic Dentist, Clinical Director, SCFD & Portside Dentistry

WE'RE ALWAYS ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS

With Locations in Whittier, Lake Forest and San Clemente